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dc.creatorMartínez Franzoni, Juliana
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-18T22:18:30Z
dc.date.available2021-10-18T22:18:30Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationhttps://globaldialogue.isa-sociology.org/volume-8-issue-3/ES
dc.identifier.urihttps://repositorio.iis.ucr.ac.cr/handle/123456789/799
dc.description.abstractLatin America is emerging from a “left turn” or “Pink Tide” that started in 1998 and lasted through the mid-2010s. Electoral competition gave progressive platforms wider influence and highlighted demands for progressive labor and social policies. This shift to the left was the political outcome of citizens’ disillusionment with the unmet promises of earlier conservative governments. This disillusionment coincided with an economic boom. Although diverse, left-wing parties and their leaders voiced demands for change, especially in living conditions. By 2000, social outcomes and public policies advanced across the region.ES
dc.language.isoesES
dc.publisherInternational Sociological AssociationES
dc.sourceDialogue Global. Magazine of the International Sociology Association Vol.8, Núm. 3ES
dc.sourceGlobal Dialogue; Vol, 8, Núm. 3: 2018
dc.subjectPolíticas de empleoES
dc.subjectParticipación de la mujerES
dc.subjectPolítica gubernamentalES
dc.subjectPobrezaES
dc.subjectIzquierdaES
dc.subjectAmérica LatinaES
dc.title¿Why Are Thre More Poor Women in Latin America?ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/contributionToPeriodicalES
dc.typecontribución a revistaES
dc.codproyecto725-B8-607
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Sociales::Instituto de Investigaciones Sociales (IIS)ES


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